Elizabeth
Kleinrock


Liz Kleinrock creates curricular content for K–12 students around issues of diversity, equity and inclusion, and specializes in designing engaging and accessible units of study for all ages of learners. She began her career in education as an AmeriCorps volunteer teacher in Oakland, California in 2009, and has since served as both a classroom educator and diversity coordinator in Los Angeles. Liz also works with schools and districts throughout the United States to develop workshops and trainings for adults that support culturally responsive practices that fit the needs of specific communities. In 2018, Liz received the Teaching Tolerance Award for Excellence in Teaching, and she has written for Heinemann Publishing, Teaching Tolerance, ASCD and EdSurge on topics such as destigmatizing privilege, trauma-informed teaching, and cultivating relationships with students and families. Recently, Liz wrote and delivered a TED Talk, “How to Talk to Kids About Taboo Topics.” She is working on her first book. 

Articles by Elizabeth

Min Jee’s Lunch

When a classmate says Min Jee’s Korean lunch is “how everyone got sick,” will her friends speak up?

Anti-Racist Work in Schools: Are You in it for the Long Haul?

In the wake of Black Lives Matter protests, educators and schools across the nation are planning anti-racist work. How will you ensure your school isn’t just going through the motions?

How Inclusive Is Your Teaching About the Environment?

How are you aligning the way you teach about the environment with the rest of your work as a social justice educator?

How My Third-Graders and I Address Consent

A TT Award winner shares how she teaches her elementary students about consent throughout the year. It’s not too early—or too late—to start.

A Teacher's Message to Young Activists After #MarchforOurLives

An elementary teacher's open letter to the young activists who remind her that the future is in good hands.
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Teaching Tolerance collage of images

Welcome to Learning for Justice—Formerly Teaching Tolerance!

Our work has evolved in the last 30 years, from reducing prejudice to tackling systemic injustice. So we’ve chosen a new name that better reflects that evolution: Learning for Justice.

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