Mica
Pollock


Mica Pollock, an anthropologist of education, studies how youth and adults struggle daily to discuss and address issues of racial difference, discrimination, and fairness in school and community settings. Her first book, Colormute: Race Talk Dilemmas in an American School explores the question: when it is helpful, and when is it harmful, to talk about racial patterns in schools? Her new book, Because of Race: How Americans Debate Harm and Opportunity in Our Schools, builds on her experience working in the U.S. Department of Education's Office for Civil Rights, where she investigated and addressed claims of discrimination in schools. Because of Race explores ongoing American arguments over opportunity denials experienced by students and families of color in educational settings. Pollock is also editor of a new book for educators, Everyday Antiracism: Getting Real about Race in School, and she is spearheading The Project on the Preparation of Educators for Diversity, a new national research effort examining efforts to prepare and assist teachers to serve diverse populations.

Articles by Mica

The Election, One Year Later: Stories From Anthropologists of Education

In the fall of 2016 and spring of 2017, these four anthropologists observed how students and educators responded to the presidential election. This winter, they followed up to see what had changed in the last year.

Standing Up Against Hate

Educators have always had the responsibility to stand up to hate and bias—but it's more necessary now than ever.

Schooltalk: Rethinking What We Say About—and to—Students Every Day

Education specialist Mica Pollock encourages you to examine how your classroom communication helps—or hinders—your students’ development.

Smart Tech Use for Equity

Become an “equity designer” with new research from Mica Pollock and colleagues.
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Teaching Tolerance collage of images

Welcome to Learning for Justice—Formerly Teaching Tolerance!

Our work has evolved in the last 30 years, from reducing prejudice to tackling systemic injustice. So we’ve chosen a new name that better reflects that evolution: Learning for Justice.

Learn More