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Informational

A Rumbling in the Mines

This chapter details the Chinese involvement in building the transcontinental railroad and the friction it caused between them and white workers, whom Chinese workers displaced from their jobs due to their willingness to work for less and not join labor unions.
by
Learning for Justice Staff
Grade Level
Subject
History
Economics
Geography
Social Justice Domain
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Informational

The Child's Defender

In this interview, Marian Wright Edelman expresses the importance of each American sending children “signals of fairness and tolerance” and helping to give them “a life that transcends boundaries of race, class, gender and other differences.”
by
Marian Wright Edelman and Sara Bullard
Grade Level
Subject
Civics
Economics
Social Justice Domain
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Multimedia

Teaching Tolerance Interview With John Lewis

In the graphic novel March, Congressman John Lewis documents his experiences as a young civil rights activist. Hear him describe his first arrest employing a nonviolent resistance strategy, as captured in the book.
by
John Lewis
Grade Level
6-8
Subject
Civics
History
Social Justice Domain
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Literature

One Million Men and Me

Based on a true person, this story is told from the perspective of a little girl whose dad took her to the Million Man March—where she saw the tears, happiness, and chants of men banding together for a common purpose.
by
Kelly Starling Lyons
Grade Level
Subject
Civics
History
Economics
Geography
Social Justice Domain
text
Informational

The Great Immigration Debate

Patricia Smith explores the nation's divide over how to deal with illegal immigration. She outlines the role of immigration in our history, notes the "wariness" felt over immigration ever since, and questions when and how Congress might act on the issue.
by
Patricia Smith
Grade Level
Subject
Civics
History
Economics
Social Justice Domain
text
Informational

White Privilege: Unpacking the Invisible Knapsack

McIntosh's article details the ways in which white people—male and female—are given unacknowledged advantages. She focuses on situations in which skin-color is the dominant priveleging factor (over class, religion, ethnic status, or geographic location) but acknowledges that many of these attributes are interconnected.
by
Peggy McIntosh
Grade Level
Subject
Civics
Economics
Social Justice Domain