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The History of African-American Social Dance

Why do we dance? African-American social dances started as a way for enslaved Africans to keep cultural traditions alive and retain a sense of inner freedom. They remain an affirmation of identity and independence. In this electric demonstration, packed with live performances, choreographer, educator and TED Fellow Camille A. Brown explores what happens when communities let loose and express themselves by dancing together.
by
Camille A. Brown
Grade Level
Subject
History
Geography
Social Justice Domain
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Informational

A Personal Mission: Sammy Younge Jr.

Although raised in a prosperous and prestigious African-American home in Tuskegee, Ala., Sammy Younge found himself drawn most to the civil rights movement. While the cause cost him his life, his actions and determination helped to transform this Southern city.
by
Learning for Justice Staff
Grade Level
Subject
History
Social Justice Domain
text
Informational

Una Vida de Esperanza

In this interview, Luis Rodriguez describes how the systemic demoralization he faced in school and society at a young age drove him to join a street gang and how writing his book, Always Running, was an attempt to call his son and other young people in similar situations to change their lives.
by
Luis Rodriguez and Sara Bullard
Grade Level
Subject
Civics
Social Justice Domain
text
Informational

The Child's Defender

In this interview, Marian Wright Edelman expresses the importance of each American sending children “signals of fairness and tolerance” and helping to give them “a life that transcends boundaries of race, class, gender and other differences.”
by
Marian Wright Edelman and Sara Bullard
Grade Level
Subject
Civics
Economics
Social Justice Domain
text
Informational

White Privilege: Unpacking the Invisible Knapsack

McIntosh's article details the ways in which white people—male and female—are given unacknowledged advantages. She focuses on situations in which skin-color is the dominant priveleging factor (over class, religion, ethnic status, or geographic location) but acknowledges that many of these attributes are interconnected.
by
Peggy McIntosh
Grade Level
Subject
Civics
Economics
Social Justice Domain
text
Informational

Welfare is a Women's Issue

This essay expounds on the injustices and false perceptions faced by women in the welfare system. Tillmon contends that the system is overrun with sexism and that until American women are liberated by equal pay, the welfare system will continue to be a trap for them.
by
Johnnie Tillmon
Grade Level