TEXT

Good Morning, Carrie/ Williams and Walker (1901)

On October 11, 1901, Bert Williams and George Walker, a Vaudeville duo known as Williams and Walker, released a hit song titled “Good Morning, Carrie.” At the turn of the century, Williams and Walker were two of the highest-grossing black musical entertainers. Today, they are most known for their blackface branding and iconography.
Author
Bert Williams and George Walker
Grade Level

This text is part of the Teaching Hard History Text Library and aligns with Key Concept 9. In addition to the source listed below the text, this information was retrieved from DAHR and YouTube.

Title page/cover for music by Carrie
Sheet music
sheet music
sheet music
sheet music
sheet music

 

First verse 

In sunny South Car’lina lives an old aunt Dinah And her daughter named Caroline. She’s winsome cute and airy, her folks they call her Carrie, I hope some day, that she’ll be mine. To meet her ev’ry ev’ning when the stars are brightly beaming Brings joy and pleasure to my heart so lone, In the light of early dawn with my banjo on my arm, I awake her from her slumber with this song: 

Chorus  

Good morning Carrie how you do this morning Was you dreaming ’bout me my pretty maid, Say look here Carrie when we gwine to marry Long spring time honey, good morning babe Good morning babe 

Second verse  

There’s dusky suitors plenty that would take my Carrie from me, But she’s promised to be only mine. With tender songs of wooing like the turtle dove a cooing, They serenade my Caroline. We’ll be wedded soon that’s certain and some hearts will be a hurtin’ When budding leaves and flowers tell ’tis spring, There’ll be no great display but on our wedding day, We’ll ask the folks around to kindly sing:   

Chorus 

Good morning Carrie how you do this morning Was you dreaming ’bout me my pretty maid, Say look here Carrie when we gwine to marry Long spring time honey, good morning babe Good morning babe 

Source
This text is in the public domain. Retrieved from https://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/8f0df1c7-0933-78e6-e040-e00a18066789#/?uuid=8f0df1c7-0937-78e6-e040-e00a18066789.
Text Dependent Questions
  1. Question
    Where does this song take place?
    Answer
    It takes place in South Carolina.
  2. Question
    What evidence showcases the intentions of the suitor singing this song?
    Answer
    He intends to marry Caroline, “I hope some day, that she’ll be mine.”
  3. Question
    How might this song showcase a shift in the ways in which first-generation freed African Americans found love in southern states?
    Answer
    It shows the ease of courtship and marriage that was not possible in prior generations of enslaved people in South Carolina. The ability to walk to a window and sing to a potential bride was in many ways unprecedented.
  4. Question
    Draw a connection between this song and a contemporary song, movie or piece of literature. In what ways are they similar?
    Answer
    Answers will vary.
Reveal Answers
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