Lessons

These robust, ready-to-use classroom lessons offer breadth and depth, spanning essential social justice topics and reinforcing critical social emotional learning skills.

Search by keyword or browse our lesson bank—you can filter lessons by grade level, subject, topic or social justice domain. And remember, you can always create, save and share your own lessons with our Learning Plan Builder.

“Teaching Tolerance provides me with the means to promote social justice, challenge bias, and engage students in discussions about diversity that would perhaps not happen otherwise.”

Grade Level
Social Justice Domain
Subject
Topic

487 Lessons

Family Ties

The Southern Poverty Law Center published “Injustice on Our Plates: Immigrant Women in the U.S. Food Industry,” a report that explores and personalizes immigration issues. Based on interviews with 150 undocumented female workers, “Injustice on Our Plates” has an accompanying teacher’s guide that includes seven theme-based lessons. The lessons are designed to encourage students to learn from the women’s first-hand accounts and to consider whether basic human rights are dependent on legal status. “Family Ties” is the fourth of the seven thematic lessons in the “Injustice on Our Plates: Immigrant Women in the U.S. Food Industry” teacher's guide. In this lesson, students analyze how media reports about undocumented workers shape people’s perceptions. Students analyze mass media to uncover the attitudes and assumptions that shape people’s perceptions and our understanding of important human rights and policy issues.
Grade Level
Subject
Reading & Language Arts
Social Studies
ELL / ESL
Social Justice Domain
January 20, 2011

Race and Poverty

In this lesson, students will learn that race is a factor often connected to poverty and that institutions can create obstacles for the poor—and for people of color who live in poverty—that block participation and achievement.
Grade Level
Subject
Reading & Language Arts
Social Studies
Economics
ELL / ESL
Social Justice Domain
February 6, 2012

Issues of Poverty

“Issues of Poverty” is comprised of four lessons with two overarching goals. First, the lessons aim to help students understand that poverty is systemic, rooted in economics, politics and discrimination. Second, the lessons provide evidence to show that poverty, far from being random, disproportionately affects Americans who have traditionally experienced oppression—African Americans, Latinos, immigrants and children.
Grade Level
Topic
Subject
Reading & Language Arts
Social Studies
Economics
ELL / ESL
Social Justice Domain
February 9, 2012

Refuse to Stand Silently By

When people are asked about doing something for social justice, they often say: “I have to find out a little more about it before I take some action.” Often, they end up not taking any action at all. This lesson will help students find out more about crucial social issues and create awareness that actions are important in the struggle for justice — and that students can start doing something to solve these problems.
Grade Level
Subject
Social Studies
Social Justice Domain
February 15, 2012

Music and the Movement

Music always has been a part of political movements. The civil rights movement was once described as the greatest singing movement in our nation’s history. Many of the songs grew out of the rich culture of the black churches in the South and fit different moods and situations: Songs for joy. Songs for sorrow. Songs for determination. Songs for irony. Songs for humor. Songs to get you past the fear. Songs to celebrate. In this lesson, students will identify political issues that are important to them, choose a song and then rewrite the words to support the issue and fit the music’s rhythm.
Grade Level
Subject
Reading & Language Arts
Social Studies
History
Social Justice Domain
February 15, 2012

Contemporary Movements

The civil rights movement of the 1950s and ‘60s, during which Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. came to prominence as a spokesperson for black people seeking equality, has been the catalyst for many contemporary civil rights movements (e.g., the Chicano movement, labor movement, environmental movement, women’s movement, LGBT civil rights movement, immigrant workers rights). This lesson invites students to see that they are part of a continuum in the long struggle for equal rights for all people.
Grade Level
Subject
Social Studies
History
Social Justice Domain
February 15, 2012
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Welcome to Learning for Justice—Formerly Teaching Tolerance!

Our work has evolved in the last 30 years, from reducing prejudice to tackling systemic injustice. So we’ve chosen a new name that better reflects that evolution: Learning for Justice.

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