Teaching Tolerance Magazine

Issue 51, Fall 2015

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Get Your Students Jazzed About Voting!

Voting rocks! So why don't more people do it? In the Fall issue of Teaching Tolerance, we invite you to ponder this question and to re-examine what, how and why you teach.

Should you teach controversial subjects? This issue covers touchy topics surrounding religion and helps you bring them into your classroom. How do the book you choose influence students? This issue helps educators see the value of culturally-responsive literacy practices. Why do you return to the classroom each day? This issue highlights the struggles teachers face in promoting equity, while the cover story reminds readers of the ultimate reason we endure those struggles: educating and empowering students to become citizens of a diverse democracy.

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Features

Departments

Letters to the Editor

You Spoke, We Listened

The Spring and Summer issues of Teaching Tolerance sparked tremendous response—from a critique of our latest cover story to praise for the art that enlivens our pages.
Ask Learning for Justice

Advice From the Experts

TT answers your tough questions. This time, advice on helping students see their agency in an unjust world.
PD Café

Burnout Blues

Burning brightly or burning out? Maintain your pep and bypass burnout with these tips.
Staff Picks

What We're Reading

Teaching Tolerance loves to read! Check out a few of our favorite diverse books for diverse readers and educators.
Story Corner

A Painter Named Kennedy

Meet Kennedy, of Mombasa, Kenya. His wheelchair doesn’t stop him from making the world a more beautiful place.
One World

Ruby Dee

Download and post this inspiring quote in your classroom.
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Abolitionists William Still, Sojourner Truth, William Loyd Garrison, unidentified male and female slaves, and Black Union soldiers in front of American flag

Applications Are Now Live for LFJ Teaching Hard History Fall 2022 Cohorts

Teaching Hard History Professional Learning Cohorts provide educators the chance to deeply engage with Learning for Justice Teaching Hard History: American Slavery framework, collaborate with LFJ staff and 25 other cohort members across the country, and gain insights and feedback on implementation—all at no cost. Submit your application today!

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