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Read Across America Week

This Read Across America Week, we hope you’ll continue introducing diverse texts to all of your students. We also encourage you to incorporate inclusive young readers’ editions in your curricula and organize social justice reading groups to discuss a diverse range of stories and critical topics alongside students and caregivers.

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Teaching Black History Beyond February

Students notice when Black history is taught only in February, but they deserve to learn this American history year-round. These resources emphasize engaging students' communities and lived experiences, including how you can incorporate local stories in lessons—and move Black history from the margins to your everyday curriculum.

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Black History in the Making

Black history isn’t only in the past—it’s happening right now. This Black History Month, commit to acknowledging and elevating today’s young Black change makers and their accomplishments year-round. Our resources will help you uplift Black activists who are changing history and those fighting for justice within their communities, and they will encourage your students to see themselves as change makers too.

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Our New Magazine Issue: White Supremacy in Education

Our Spring 2021 issue is here! This issue introduces our new name, Learning for Justice, and dives deep into the ways that white supremacy manifests in U.S. schools—including in teacher preparation programs and distance learning. You’ll also learn the stories of educators and students who push back against white supremacy on their campuses and in their communities.

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Why We Need Black History Month—Especially This Year

Black History Month begins February 1! And while we know anti-racist educators teach Black history year-round, we hope these resources will help you consider how you're framing the month this particular year. Learn more about the need for—and history behind—Black History Month and get support for teaching Black history in a way that moves beyond trauma and embraces liberation and resistance.

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Addressing Trauma and Loss Due to Coronavirus

As we mourn the deaths of educators due to coronavirus here in Montgomery, Alabama, we are also lifting up school communities throughout the country who are dealing with losses of their own. These resources can help you recognize and address this trauma with your students and yourself.

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A Pledge for the New Semester

As you dive into a new semester amid a historic presidential inauguration and political moment, we know the challenges feel overwhelming. We hope these resources help you contextualize this moment, navigate a polarized classroom and plan actions you can take immediately to start the semester equitably.

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Teach MLK in Connection With the Attack on the U.S. Capitol

The same day a Black man and a Jewish man were voted into the U.S. Senate, a mob toting Confederate and Nazi flags attacked the U.S. Capitol. As you teach about Martin Luther King Jr. ahead of his birthday observation, acknowledge the link between the racism he resisted and the violence we witnessed at the Capitol. These resources will help foster related discussions within the context of U.S. history.

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Leading Conversations After the Insurrection in Washington D.C.

In the coming days and weeks, we hope you'll offer students important context for the January 6 insurrection at the U.S. Capitol—and we'll keep sharing resources to help you do so. But we know you're likely already talking with students about what happened. We hope these resources help.

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Recommit to Critical Conversations

As we return to school, we can commit to checking bias in ourselves and others and speaking up every time students or colleagues make biased comments. These resources can help prepare and facilitate those critical conversations.