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the moment

The Radical Truth of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., born January 15, 1929, became the most well known leader of the modern civil rights movement. But the truth of King’s legacy is often whitewashed and sanitized. On his birthday, MLK Day and year round, use these resources to provide students with a more complete, radical context of King's fight for justice—and discuss how his work still creates ripples today.

the moment

Honoring Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Day

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s birthday is an opportunity to tell a nuanced story about a complicated man and movement. This edition of The Moment includes two articles that can help you teach MLK’s legacy with the complexity it deserves—even to young students. We’ve also included a downloadable, printable One World Poster featuring a quote from King’s “Letter From a Birmingham Jail.”

the moment

Honor Martin Luther King Jr. and the Full Movement

As Martin Luther King Jr. Day approaches, educators across the nation will teach about King’s life and works. Countless others will echo his famous quotes. Few will offer a full picture of who King truly was—or of the collectivist movement that surrounded him. These resources can help you offer a fuller account of King, his peers and the ongoing legacy of their shared dreams and actions.

the moment

Observing the 50th Anniversary of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s death

April 4, 2018, marked the 50th anniversary of Martin Luther King Jr.’s assassination. With this edition of The Moment, we invite you and your students to reflect on his life and legacy and make connections to the modern movements he inspired.

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Abolitionists William Still, Sojourner Truth, William Loyd Garrison, unidentified male and female slaves, and Black Union soldiers in front of American flag

Applications Are Now Live for LFJ Teaching Hard History Fall 2022 Cohorts

Teaching Hard History Professional Learning Cohorts provide educators the chance to deeply engage with Learning for Justice Teaching Hard History: American Slavery framework, collaborate with LFJ staff and 25 other cohort members across the country, and gain insights and feedback on implementation—all at no cost. Submit your application today!

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